Explaining the Twenties

In 1920, for the first time, the United States census revealed that more Americans lived in cities than in rural areas. This fact speaks to a dramatic cultural shift that had taken place. The older ethnically homogenous white Anglo-Saxon Protestant (WASP) culture, characterized by their traditional religion and farm life fell into decline. Overtaking its … Read more

All Quiet on the Western Front

The chapter begins with German soldiers at rest after fourteen days of fierce battle on the Western Front. A double ration of food has been prepared so the soldiers are eating their fill. Paul Baumer, the protagonist and narrator of the novel, watches in amazement as his friends, Tjaden and Muller, eat another helping; he … Read more

Bastille Day, on the Fourteenth of July

“Bastille Day, on the Fourteenth of July, is the French symbol of the end of the Monarchy and the beginning of the French Revolution” (www. hightowertrail. com). It is very much like Independence Day in the United States because it is a celebration of the beginning of a new form of government. There are several … Read more

The Civil War had begun

“The tragic fireball in the night imagined by Jefferson had finally rung. The Missouri Compromise had failed. Proslavery and antislavery civilians clashed in the streets and took up arms. Thousands of Northerners were willing to die for their beliefs. The Civil War had begun. The states were at war with each other. ” This dividing … Read more

Vimy Ridge

It was at Vimy, in 1917, that all four Divisions of the Canadian Corps attacked simultaneously for the first time, about 100,000 men taking part in the battle. Vimy Ridge was an important part of the Germans’ defenses, barring the way to the mines and factories in the Douai plain, which had been of great … Read more

Causes of The Great Depression

The Great Depression was the worst economic slump ever in U. S. history, and one which spread to virtually all of the industrialized world. The depression began in late 1929 and lasted for about a decade. Many factors played a role in bringing about the depression; however, the main cause for the Great Depression was … Read more

The economic downturns of the Great Depression

The economic downturns of the Great Depression contributed to the countys fascination with gangster genres. As Americans lost their jobs or saw their farms foreclosed on by the once admired establishment or banking system; with public endorsement gangsters descended in spirit from Americas frontier outlaws such as the James Gang, and led by desperadoes like … Read more

The Continuant Domination of the Aboriginal People

In any Canadian history class we learnt about how the Europeans settled in Canada to build a new life. Furthermore, as kids we have always learnt that Christopher Columbus had discovered Canada as an empty piece of land, with no habitants whatsoever. (Flashback Canada, 1994) These statements are false. Native Canadians had already been living … Read more

For God and Home and Native Land

In Illinois during the year 1900, temperance and prohibition were prominent issues on the social and political stage. The temperance movement found most of its adherents in middle-class women. Urban women saw the linkages between poverty and alcoholism, while many rural women were aware of how the isolation of farm life amplified the horrors of … Read more

The Treaty of Versailles

The Treaty of Versailles was intended to be a peace agreement between the Allies and the Germans. Versailles created political discontent and economic chaos 1in Germany. The Peace Treaty of Versailles represented the results of hostility and revenge and opened the door for a dictator and World War II. November 11, 1918 marked the end … Read more

The Atomic Bomb

It was during the Second World War that the United States became a world power, thanks in a large part to its monopoly on atomic weapons. The atomic bomb is a weapon with great explosive power that results form the sudden release of energy upon the splitting, or fission of the nuclei of such heavy … Read more

Assassination: Gaius Julius Caesar

Many of his reforms were excellent, but he also was hungry for the power of Roman Dictator, which would give him absolute power for as long as he required it. Throughout his life he did many things including creating the calendar that we know today, advancing mathematics, and many other scholarly things. When he became … Read more

The Toilet Yes…those tales you’ve heard are true

The toilet was first patented in England in 1775, invented by one Thomas Crapper, but the extraordinary automatic device called the flush toilet has been around for a long time. Leonardo Da Vinci in the 1400’s designed one that worked, at least on paper, and Queen Elizabeth I reputably had one in her palace in … Read more

The Prince and the Pauper

On an autumn day in the ancient city of London, in the second quarter of sixteenth century, a boy was born to a poor family of the name Canty. On the same day another English baby was born of a rich family of the name of Tudor. There was talk in England about the new … Read more

The Hellenistic period

The Romans, unlike the Greeks were not gifted in abstract thought. They constructed no original system of philosophy, invented no major literary forms, and made no scientific discoveries. Yet, they excelled in the art of government and empire building, they created a workable world-state and developed skills in administration, law, and practical affairs. In the … Read more

World War II Report

The 1930’s were a very turbulent time period for the entire world. Many events occurred during this time that lead to World War II. It all began with a few events that set the stage for the entire thing. Things continued to get worse, until finally, the seemingly inevitable happened. There were several events that … Read more

The Assyrians

There are different periods of the Assyrian empire. The first was called the Old Assyrian period which lasted from 2000-1550 BC. Then there was the Middle Assyrian period which lasted from 1550-1200 BC. The last was the Neo-Assyrian period which lasted from 1200-600 BC. The final phase of the Neo-Assyrian period is called the Assyrian … Read more

Reasoning Revolution

The age of enlightenment took place in the 18th century and was thought by many of the period to be long overdue. Spurred by writers wishing to “awaken” the public from their stupor, it was an age of change. Enlightenment writers tackled subjects from inconsistencies in religion to the oppression of women in society. Utilized … Read more

Life in the 1900’s

Life in the 1900’s was depressing and was an era filled with extremely hard and strenous work that didn’t offer any future for the average canadian in doing better. If you were an average wage earner you would be virtually stuck in the same job for the rest of your life, while rich maintained their … Read more

Greek government

Greeks made many long lasting contributions to the Western Civilization. Not only in art and architecture, but in math, science, and philosophy also. The Greeks influenced many civilizations that developed after them. Societies today also have taken some aspects and ideas of the Greek government. Socrates stated the quote in document one. Socrates lived from … Read more

The Days of Elegance

The term “splendid” is one that most English speaking people are familiar with. To most of those people it has a meaning related to the overall appearance or feeling of what ever is being described. Webster’s dictionary defines the term as: 1. magnificent and sumptuous. 2. distinguished or glorious. Splendor is more that that. It … Read more

Queen Elizabeth I

In England, the period between the Gothic and Renaissance styles is known as the Elizabethan age. It reached its peak in the late 1500s, toward the end of the long reign of Queen Elizabeth I, and is often considered the last phase of the long- lasting Tudor style. Although the Elizabethan age produced a certain … Read more

Australian Immigration and Its Effects

Australia is an island continent which is geographically isolated from the rest of the world. This has resulted in the evolution of many unique plants and animals and the development of a very fragile ecosystem. This ecosystem has been influenced by human immigration for many thousands of years. The original immigrants were the Aborigines who … Read more

Pompey the Great

Gnaeus Pompeius, better known as Pompey, was born on September 29, 106 BC. He was four years older than Julius Caesar. Pompeys father was a rich Roman noble, who was elected to the consul in 89 BC. Pompey distinguished himself as a great leader early in his life. In the civil war between Gaius Marius … Read more

Pierre and Marie Curie

Marie and Pierre Curie’s pioneer research was again brought to mind when on 20 April last year, their bodies were taken from their place of burial at Sceaux, just outside Paris, and in a solemn ceremony were laid to rest under the mighty dome of the Pantheon. Marie Curie thus became the first woman to … Read more

Roaring Twenties Essay

Americans, in the years following the end of World War I found themselves in an era, where the people simply wished to detach themselves from the troubles of Europeans and the rest of the world. During the years of the Twenties, the economy was prosperous, there was widespread social reform, new aspects of culture were … Read more

The War Of 1812 And Its Effect

By any criteria the years following the War of 1812, otherwise known as the Era of Good Feelings, must be considered a time of exceptional growth and development in the United States, but above all, it may be considered a time of evolution and ripening of American nationalism, unification, and economic prowess. The war of … Read more

The world of sports and physics

Physics is everywhere in the world of sports. It can be found when a boxer punches a guy, or when a person is stabbing something. The shot put is an event which has many practical applications to physics. From the time the thrower begins moving, to the time the shot hits the ground, physics can … Read more

Anglo-Saxon Belief In Fate And Christianity

The Unity of the Unknown and the Eternal Security: The Anglo-Saxon Belief in Christianity and Fate Imagine a life in which one is simply a pawn at the hands of a mysterious higher force stumbling and meandering through life’s tribulations. Until Pope Gregory the Great was sent to spread Christianity throughout England, the Anglo- Saxons … Read more

The Enlightenment

The Enlightenment was an 18th century European intellectual movement in which ideas concerning God, reason, nature, and man were combined into a world view that instigated revolutionary developments in art, philosophy, and politics. Although there are many separate stages to this period, it has been termed “the Enlightenment” for simplicity. The Enlightenment was characterized by … Read more