Home » Andrew jackson » Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson

There are many things that set Andrew Jackson apart from other presidents. His policies and personality set him apart from most. Although he was the seventh president, he was the first in many ways. Jackson was the first president to be born in a log cabin, and he was the first president to ride on a railroad train. Along with that, he was the only president to serve in both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812.

Andrew Jackson was also the first to have a vice-president (John C. Calhoun) resign, he was the first to marry a divorcee, he was the first to be nominated at a national convention, the first to use an informal Kitchen Cabinet of advisors, and he was the first president to use the pocket veto to kill a congressional bill. While these things are truly incomparable, they are not all that set Andrew Jackson apart from other presidents. Throughout this paper, many more accomplishments in Andrew Jacksons life will be discussed. Andrew Jackson was born on March 15, 1767, in the Waxhaw settlement on the western frontier of South Carolina.

He was born into a poor family. Jackson was the third child of Scotch-Irish parents. His father, who was also named Andrew, died in a logging accident just a few days before the birth of his third son and future president. After her husbands death, Jacksons mother, Elizabeth Hutchinson Jackson, raised her three sons at the home of one of her sisters. At age 13, Andrew Jackson joined the Continental Army as a courier. The Revolution proved to be a tough time for the Jackson family. Hugh, one of Andrews older brothers, died after the battle of Stono Ferry, South Carolina, in 1779.

Two years later, Andrew and his other brother, Robert, were taken prisoner for a few weeks. Both Andrew and Robert contracted smallpox during their imprisonment, and Robert died just days after they were released. Later that same year, Andrews mother went to Charleston to nurse the American prisoners of war. Not long after she arrived, Elizabeth became ill with what was either smallpox or cholera and died. Andrew became an orphan at the age of fourteen, and he went to live with his uncle, a wealthy slave and land owner.

When he was seventeen, he moved to Salisbury, North Carolina to study law and was later admitted into the North Carolina Bar. In 1976, Tennessee became the sixteenth state to enter the Union. Not long after that, Jackson was elected Tennessees first congressman. The next year, Jackson was elected to be a U. S. senator by the Tennessee legislator. However, he only served on session before he resigned. Following his resignation, he served six years on the Tennessee Supreme Court as a judge. Jacksons military career resurfaced in 1802 when he was named major general of the Tennessee militia.

Ten years later, he was give the rank of major general of U. S. forces. In 1814, he was advanced to major general in the regular army. General Andrew Jackson came out as a national hero after the War of 1812, mainly because of the defeat of the British at the Battle of New Orleans. This was when Jackson received the nickname of Old Hickory. He had been directed to march his troops to Mississippi, but upon their arrival, they were told to disband because they were no longer needed. Jackson refused to disband, and proceeded to march his 2,500 troops back to Tennessee.

His strict discipline led his troops to call him Old Hickory because they believed him to be as tough as hickory wood, and the nickname stuck. Before Jacksons presidency, he was known as a great fighter who didnt let anyone mess with him. As stated in the Brittanica Encyclopedia, Charles Dickinson once insulted Jacksons wife, Rachel Donelson Jackson, and Jackson challenged him to a duel with pistols. Andrew stood there and purposely let Dickinson shoot first, knowing he was a much better shot. Dickinson shot Jackson in the chest, and Jackson stood there like a tree.

He first shot at Dickinson misfired, but the second was right on target, and he killed Dickinson. The bullet in Jacksons chest nearly missed his heart and could not be removed, so Andrew Jackson had to live the rest of his life with a bullet in his chest. Jacksons first presidential campaign was the 1824 election. Many of Jacksons followers refer to this election as the Stolen Election because Jackson easily captured the popular vote, but did not have enough electoral votes to win. Because of this, the election was decided by the House of Representatives.

Jacksons opponents were John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, and William H. Crawford. Both Adams and Clay were disgusted at the thought of Jackson as president, so Clay gave his support to Adams, and Adams was elected president. In the next four years, Andrew Jackson and his followers repeatedly condemned the Adams administration. Jackson believed he was the peoples candidate and never missed an opportunity to point out that the peoples choice in 1824 had been disregarded. His approach worked, and he beat Adams in the 1828.

The election of 1828 brought about much mudslinging in regards to Jacksons marriage. His wife, Rachel, had an unhappy first marriage with Lewis Robards. The Kentucky legislature decided to allow Robards to sue for divorce, but he did not do so right away. Andrew and Rachel mistook the permission to sue for an actual divorce declaration. They got married in 1791 while Rachel was still legally married. Robards eventually filed for divorce in 1793, making sure to mention Rachels supposed adultery with Andrew Jackson.

Andrew and Rachel remarried in 1794, but that did not stop the sometimes spiteful gossip. Rachel died just a few weeks before Andrews inauguration. Jackson put the responsibility of her early death on the stress caused by the public debate about their alleged adultery during the presidential campaign. During his presidency, Jackson vetoed twelve pieces of legislation, which was more than the first six presidents combined. One of the major issues during Jacksons presidency was his refusal to approve the recharter of the Bank of the United States.

Jacksons belief was that the Bank was operated for the sole benefit of the upper classes at the cost of the working people. Jackson vetoed, and the Banks supporters in congress did not have enough votes to override him. The charter expired in 1836, but Jackson had majorly weakened it before that by removing millions of dollars of federal funds. Another issue during Jacksons presidency was his relationship with the Native Americans. He led troops against them in the Creek War as well as the First Seminole War.

In his first term as president, the Indian Removal Act was passed. This was an act that offered the Indians land west of the Mississippi river if they would leave their tribal homes in the east. Two years later, he made the relationship worse after the Supreme Courts ruling in the case of Worcester vs. Georgia. The court had found that the state of Georgia did not have jurisdiction over the Cherokees; however, both Georgia and Andrew Jackson chose to ignore the Supreme Courts decision.

In 1838-39, Georgia forced the Cherokees to march west. Approximately twenty-five percent of the Indians were dead before they reached Oklahoma, and the Indians named the march the Trail of Tears. This did take place after Jacksons presidential terms; nevertheless, the beginnings of the march started when Jackson failed to maintain the legal rights of the Native Americans. After serving two terms as president, Andrew Jackson retired in 1837 to his home near Nashville that he and Rachel had named The Hermitage.

When first built, it had been nothing more than a small cabin, but by the time Jackson moved in 1837, it had been remodeled and rebuilt into a large plantation home. Andrew Jackson remained a power in politics after his retirement. He helped to secure the presidency for Martin Van Buren, his successor, and in 1840, he helped in Van Burens failed campaign for re-election. He also labored for the annexation of Texas and stayed close to future president James Polk, who had been one of Jacksons greatest supporters in Congress as Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.

In his last years, Andrew Jacksons health declined greatly, and he passed away at the Hermitage on June 8, 1845. Throughout his life, Andrew Jackson had many significant accomplishments, both good and bad. He was a loyal friend and a fierce enemy. He was truly unique, and while he was the seventh president, he was the first president to do many things. Jackson had his share of good times and bad times, but in the end, he proved to be a remarkably amazing man.

Cite This Work

To export a reference to this essay please select a referencing style below:

Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.

Leave a Comment

Home » Andrew jackson » Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson

Jackson was a protector of democracy for “Equal protection and equal benefits” for all men. He wanted to be rid of any organization or institution promoting specific privilege to anyone. Jackson felt that over time, the offices of the federal system had grown mold to a uniform party. He proceeded to seek diversity amongst officers, and while he removed no more officials than Jefferson, he succeeded in diversifying the system. Since he believed that the power belonged to the people, Jackson instituted a new method for selecting presidential candidates.

While previously there was held a Congressional Caucus, Jackson initiated a national nominating convention in order that the people might elect their candidates. Jackson responding to challenge: Nullification crisis Jackson was presented with the problem of dealing with angry South Carolinians who were angered by tariffs. His vice-president, Calhoun, a native to the protesting state, resigned from the vice-presidency to aid his state. He aided in preventing their secession from the Union, as he joined the pro-nullification group of elected officials.

The governor of South Carolina, Hayne, led the nullifiers, and Calhoun took his seat in the Senate Jackson was infuriated with Calhoun, who realizing there was no wide-spread support for nullification [as time progressed], was bailed out by Henry Clay. Clay devised the plan that would lower the tariff eventually back to its original value. Maysville Veto As president, Jackson saw a distinct separation of federal and state government. When the Maysville Road Bill came into existence, the funding for the pike was to come partially from the Federal government.

Jackson chose to veto this proposal, though, because the building of the road was a project within the state, and should therefore be funded by the state that it benefits. While his intention was proper, the veto came under scrutiny because while the construction was an intrastate project it was to be part of a nationally benefiting road. Jackson’s vetoes, however, were for the most part accepted. Movement of the Indians west of the Mississippi

Jackson possessed a certain hatred for the Indians, which came to be the national attitude; rather than the original belief that they were civilized savages, they were now considered uncivilized savages incapable of being tamed. White settlers wanted removal of Indians for fear and, more importantly, their land. Militias formed in the West and were very successful. In the South, many people wanted to allow the Indians that were civilized, like the Cherokee, to remain on their land. The eventual result was the passage of the Removal Act, which provided the necessary funds for the relocation of Indians to the West.

The Cherokee then found favor in their appeal to the Supreme Court (Marshall and Jackson were long time foes), however, Marshall didn’t enforce the ruling, and the Cherokee were eventually dissolved due to Jackson’s hatred. Some escaped to North Carolina, others took money to leave, and the remaining majority of all were forced from their homes [at bayonet point] to make a long “trek of tears” to their new homes, west of the Mississippi. The Seminoles, however, were partially stubborn. Some left for relocation, while others joined escaped slaves to rise against the government.

While unsuccessful, we never managed to totally relocate them. Jackson dismantles the Federal bank Seeing that the National Bank was a monopoly, Jackson set out to destroy it. Jackson was successful enough in winning people to his side of the issue that he forced the bank’s president, Biddle, to take measure. Biddle responded by winning over some of Jackson’s followers along with certain influential people. Biddle applied for renewal of the charter for the bank four years early, and it passed Congress but was of course vetoed and deemed by Jackson to be “unconstitutional.

Congress was unable to override the veto, and so the issue became a political determinant in the following presidential election. Jackson was reelected, though, and continued to “destroy the monster” by taking out of it the federal funds. Needing the approval of the secretary of treasury, it took Jackson three men to find someone to cooperate. Jackson then began to cutting funds from the bank and putting them in “pet banks. ” It got to the point where the National Bank had poor credit to loan. Businesses hence suffered, and Biddle and Jackson blamed it on each other.

Biddle, feeling the suffering would result in rechartering, was aided by foreign friends who appealed to Congress for recharter, however, as they failed and business failed, Biddle did as well and Jackson killed the Hemingway was taught music, hunting, and fishing from his parents, but the one thing that interested Hemingway the most was writing. Ernest Miller Hemingway was born at eight oclock in the morning on July 21, 1899 in Oak Park, Illinois (Baker 3). Almost sixty-two years later, on the morning of July 2, 1961 Hemingway selected one of his shotguns from his closet, went upstairs, and shot himself in the head (Baker 564).

Born in the family home, Hemingway was the second of Dr. Clarence and Grace Hall Hemingways six children; he had four sisters and one brother. He was named after his maternal grandfather Ernest Hall and his great uncle Miller Hall (Baker 2). Ernest was married four times in his life. He and his first wife, Hadley Richardson, were introduced while he was living at his friends house (Brian 9). The two quickly fell in love. While he could do no wrong with his writing career, his personal life had began to show signs of decline.

He divorced his first wife Hadley in 1927 and married Pauline Pfeiffer (Brian 1). The civil war caused another kind of war for the Hemingways, a marital war. Hemingway had met a young writer named Martha Gellhorn in Key West and the two would go on to conduct a secret affair for almost four years before Hemingway divorced Pauline and married Martha Gellhorn (Brian 63). Later, Hemingway was seriously injured and was hospitalized. His wife Martha, showed no signs of compassion. He then met Mary Welsh, who he said was Marthas “antithesis. ” Hemingway divorced Martha and married Mary (Brian 79).

Hemingway received his formal schooling in the Oak Park public school system. In high school he was mediocre at sports, playing football, swimming, water sports, basketball and serving as the track team manager. He also enjoyed working on the high school newspaper (Baker 17-29). Hemingway graduated in the spring of 1917, and instead of going to college the following fall, like his parents had expected, he took a job as a cub reporter. The job was arranged for him by his uncle Tyler who was a close friend of the chief editorial writer of the paper.

When he heard the Red Cross was taking volunteers as ambulance drivers, he quickly signed up. He was accepted in December of 1917, left his job at the paper in April of 918 and sailed for Europe in May (Baker 38). The war was an inspirational time in writing for Hemingway as well. He wrote his popular novel, A Farewell To Arms. Another of Hemingways war novels was For Whom The Bell Tolls. Examples of his work in short stories are, “Hills Like White Elephants,” a symbolic story concerning abortion and choice, and Take Nothing, which is a volume of his short stories.

Ernest Hemingways “Hills Like White Elephants” is thought to be one of his most symbolic stories. His development of theme and symbolism makes the story stick out from the other stories he has written in the past. These two aspects of literature that he focuses on in this story make it very interesting. Through the use of symbolism, Hemingway shows the process of maturity, choice making, and abortion. In “Hills Like White Elephants,” theme is an important element of literature. Through this story, Hemingway examines women and the choices that they have to make.

He also discusses pregnancy, abortion, and maturity. The two main characters in this story are Jig, the woman who is pregnant, and the American man, who is never named. These two characters are confronted with a choice, whether or not the woman should have an abortion. The theme of adulthood is shown because the characters in this story make their own choices. They are mature enough to have a relationship, have a baby, and think logically about the effects of having an abortion. ” (Mansilla) Along with the idea of maturity, comes the idea of pregnancy.

Jig seems to be a mature woman. She has taken on the responsibility of pregnancy, and is now trying to make the mature choice of whether or not to have the abortion. “The theme of pregnancy is a main theme. The story shows what comes along with being pregnant; choices, responsibilities and maturity. (Mansilla) Choices are being made by the characters throughout the story. The American man and Jig have to decide what to drink, and on whether or not she want to actually “do it”, referring to having the abortion or not. The man says that she does not have to if she does not want to.

Symbolism is another important element in this story by Ernest Hemingway. This story is one of Hemingways most symbolic stories. Every part of this story has nothing to do with hills or white elephants. Mansilla states that the title “Hills Like White Elephants” is symbolic. The hills symbolize the tomach of a pregnant woman, and white elephants symbolize things that are unwanted, such as the fetus. Another example of Hemingways use of symbolism in this story is during the conversation between the two at the storys beginning. They look like white elephants” she said. The man replies, “I have never seen one. ” (Hemingway 342) When the man states that he had never seen a white elephant before, it symbolizes that he had never before been a father (Mansilla). During the course of the story, the man and woman are faced with many decisions about having the abortion or not. While they are talking , Jig tates, “It isnt ours anymore And once they have taken it away, you never get it back. ” (Hemingway 344). This remark shows that once the woman decides to have the abortion, she can not go back.

They can not re-create the baby after it has been destroyed. Hemingway has written many short stories that include literary concepts such as symbolism, and theme, however, this one stands out from the rest, Every line in this story has some significant meaning. Not only the lines spoken by the characters in the story are symbolic, but the title as well. Ernest Hemingway wrote many short stories about war, love, maturity, and ther aspects of life. He examined how both men and women feel about certain subjects.

Despite the fact that Hemingways education came to a halt after his enrollment in the Red Cross, he wrote brilliant stories that combined the use of theme, symbolism, and other literary aspects. These stories are very thought-provoking and have not, and never will be forgotten. Hemingways brilliant use of these literary elements is what has made Ernest Hemingway the very well known, ever-so-popular author that he has always been. His novels, short stories, and poems will live on to inspire future writers, as they have done countless times in the past.

Cite This Work

To export a reference to this essay please select a referencing style below:

Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.

Leave a Comment