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The Perils Of Obedience Stanley Milgram Summary

The Perils Of Obedience is a book by Stanley Milgram about the dangers of blindly following orders. The book explores how easily people can be coerced into harming others, simply because they are told to do so by someone in a position of authority.

The book is a scathing indictment of the education system, which Milgram believed was responsible for creating “obedient zombies” who were more likely to follow orders without question. The book has been influential in shaping public opinion on the importance of critical thinking and independent thought.

In The Perils of Obedience, Stanley Milgram explores the lengths people will go to in order to obey authority figures. To reach his findings, Milgram conducted an experiment with a group of undergraduates from Yale University. The experiment had three participants: the experimenter, the “teacher” and the “learner”.

The “teacher” was given electric shocks of increasing intensity whenever the “learner” made a mistake, The “teacher” was not actually harming the “learner”, but they didn’t know that. The results of the first experiment were that 65% of the subjects continued to give shocks even when the “learner” was screaming in pain. Milgram then replicated this experiment with different variations and found similar results. The implications of these findings are far-reaching and disturbing.

They suggest that people are willing to obey authority figures even when they know what they are doing is wrong. The experiments also raise questions about the role of obedience in education. Are students more likely to learn if they are obedient to their teachers? Or is it possible that they could learn more if they question authority and think for themselves? The Perils of Obedience is a thought-provoking book that will leave you questioning everything you thought you knew about obedience and education.

The teacher would read a list of words. The learner, who is secured to an electric chair, must recall the terms linked to one another while strapped in place. If the learner fails to respond correctly, the teacher will be compelled to deliver a shock ranging from 15 to 450 volts. (para. 5) Milgram sought forecasts on the outcome of his research from psychiatrists, sophomore college students, middle-class persons, graduate students and professors in behavioral science disciplines before conducting it.

The psychiatrists predicted that only a small minority of subjects would be willing to inflict severe pain on the learner, with most people quitting the experiment well before reaching the highest voltage levels. The predictions of the college students and middle-class adults were very similar to those of the psychiatrists. The graduate students and faculty in behavioral sciences correctly predicted that a majority of subjects would be willing to inflict very high levels of pain, but they greatly underestimated the percentage who would go to the full 450 volts. (para. 7)

When looking at The Perils Of Obedience it is clear that Stanley Milgram was interested in exploring how far people would go when obey an authority figure, even if it meant causing harm to another person. The results of his experiments showed that a majority of people were willing to inflict a great deal of pain on another person, even when they were clearly in distress. The results of the experiments have important implications for our understanding of obedience and authority.

They suggest that we should be very careful about blindly following orders, even when they come from someone in a position of authority. The experiments also show the importance of education and training in helping people to resist harmful orders. By understanding the dangers of obedience, we can help to create a world where people are more likely to think for themselves and stand up against unjust authority.

Every person believed that the teachers would disobey the experimenter. The greatest portion of the teachers displayed worry once the learners started demonstrating distress. Nevertheless, 60 percent of them followed through with orders until completion electric shocks to 450 volts.

The results were so alarming that the study was almost shut down. The experimenter, Stanley Milgram, had to change the design and add more safeguards to protect the participants.

Despite these changes, the study still produced troubling results. The majority of people are willing to obey authority figures, even when they are asked to do something that goes against their values or common sense. The findings from this research have been used to explain some of the most horrific events in history, such as the Holocaust and the My Lai massacre. The study also has implications for modern life, as people must question orders from those in positions of power.

The results were brushed aside by critics as having no bearing on “normal” individuals, since the topics featured were Yale students. According to Milgram’s colleagues, these students became extremely aggressive and competitive when provoked. (para. 27) The second round of tests included professionals, white-collar employees, jobless people, and industrial workers.

The results were the same as the first set of experiments. The individuals who delivered the shocks were not aggressive or psychopathic, they were “normal” people who were caught up in the experiment and obeyed authority. The conclusion of the study was that Milgram’s research supported his hypothesis that “ordinary” people are likely to obey authority figures even when ordered to do something that goes against their personal conscience.

The Perils of Obedience is a 1974 article written by Stanley Milgram. The article summarizes Milgram’s famous obedience experiments, in which he studied how willing people are to obey an authority figure who tells them to do something that goes against their personal conscience.

The findings of the study showed that “ordinary” people are likely to obey authority figures even when ordered to do something that goes against their personal conscience. The article includes a discussion of the implications of the findings and how they can be applied to real-world situations. The article is important reading for anyone interested in psychology or social science.

When the Milgram experiment was replicated using “ordinary” participants, however, the result was quite comparable. The studies were also done in various countries throughout the world, and scientists discovered that learners’ obedience levels were actually somewhat greater. ( para 28) When teachers had to choose between shocking their pupils for giving an incorrect answer at a particular level or not shocking them at all, the usual shock was less than 60 volts.

The level of obedience decreased when the learner was made to be more responsible for his or her own actions. The results of these experiments have important implications for our understanding of human behavior.

While the obedient person may feel they are acting morally, they may be causing great harm to another individual. The perils of obedience illustrate the importance of thinking for oneself and questioning authority. When faced with a difficult situation, it is essential to stop and consider the possible consequences of one’s actions.

The Stanley Milgram experiment showed that people will often obey authority figures even when asked to do something that goes against their personal beliefs. This can have dangerous consequences if those in positions of power abuse their authority. It is important to be aware of the potential for obedience in order to avoid blindly following orders that could result in harm.

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