Short History of “Bebop”

It hasn’t influenced many genres out with Jazz (“West Coast Jazz”, “Modal Jazz” and “Cool Jazz” all being seen as developed from he styles and unpredictability of their predecessor) but has arguably touched one genre, Rock, in the form of powerful and complicated solos. The common Jazz progression of II – V- I Isn’t a well-used feature of “Bebop” and Instead chord progressions from Swing songs are often taken directly and sped up and given more Intrinsic and complicated chords that still employ the same trial, meaning TTS are being replaced with flattened TTS, sharpened TTS and sharpened 1 lath.

This quite often leads to sounding quite complex as opposed to the tutee smooth and cool sounding effects of swing chord progressions but still keeping the effect of the 5th driving back to the 1st. The idea of a “riff’ was well and truly alive in “Bebop” despite most of the songs being improvised. Generally the rhythm section would keep underlying harmonies going while long improvisations strung together a theme which reared its head, usually, at the beginning and end of the piece. This phrase was occasionally repeated more often and therefore could be termed a riff.

Beyond Scat singing, there are no discernible or extinguishable lyrics in “Bebop” pieces and as for rhythm, there was no particular formula for how Scat singing should be used or placed within the piece. Dizzy Gillespie (Trumpet) was one of the pioneers of “Bebop” and a major influence to jazz musicians years after his time. He was most well-known for songs such as “Salt Peanuts” and his work generally contains a lot of soloing and use of themes. Charlie Parker (Tenor and Alto Sax), like Dizzy Gillespie, was a pioneer of “Bebop” and a major influence within the genre.

Parker was well known for ploys on his nickname, Hardboard”, but in a musical sense was known for his innovative uses of rhythm, harmonies and melody. Chest Baker (Trumpet), though a musician connected with bebop much later than Gillespie or Parker, was one who, along with Gerry Mulligan (Baritone Sax) managed to put his own spin on “Bebop”. The pair would employ an almost Question and Answer like melody and counter melody which was quite different to the repeated lines of melody which were evident In Parker and Gillespie pieces.

Milt Jackson (Vibes) was a musician discovered by none other Han Dizzy Gillespie and went on to become an Icon In not only “Bebop” but several other Jazz Idioms. His improvisations were renowned for the use of “Blue notes”. The standard “Bop” band consisted of a rhythm section, Plano and often a variation of brass Instruments (but could employ Instruments not normally associated with Jazz such as accordions and the clarinet) and while not normally as large as”Bldg Band” or “Dixieland” the numbers could swell to a salary size on occasion. Generally the melody would be played on a brass Instrument but soloing was not exclusive to hat section.

BY JWi1127 interchanged phrases within the music. It hasn’t influenced many genres out with Jazz progression of II – V- I isn’t a well-used feature of “Bebop” and instead chord intrinsic and complicated chords that still employ the same triad, meaning TTS are quite smooth and cool sounding effects of Swing chord progressions but still keeping married”, but in a musical sense was known for his innovative uses of rhythm, was quite different to the repeated lines of melody which were evident in Parker and Han Dizzy Gillespie and went on to become an icon in not only “Bebop” but several other Jazz idioms.

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